2019 US Coffee Championships Coming to Kansas City

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“The 2019 U.S. Coffee Championships (USCC) will be taking place in Kansas City, Missouri, on March 15-17, according to an announcement from USCC organizers today.

USCC events are typically held in conjunction with the Specialty Coffee Association (SCA) Expo, where thousands of coffee professionals are already gathered each year. Yet this year, the World Barista Championship and World Brewers Cup competitions are taking place during the SCA Expo in Boston in April, meaning U.S. champs must be crowned ahead of that event.”

“This is a special year because the U.S. Coffee Championships will take place outside of the Specialty Coffee Expo,” Melissa McGuinness, senior event manager of national competitions at the SCA said in today’s announcement.”

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Restaurants Are the Next Big Coworking Trend

Spacious members working at Crave Fishbar in New York City’s Upper West Side.

“If you walk past Crave Fishbar on a weekday afternoon, you might make the mistake of thinking it’s open for lunch. The restaurant, located on New York City’s Upper West Side, certainly looks busy enough. On a recent Thursday visit, I counted a few dozen people sitting in the restaurant’s booths or at the bar. Most of them were hunched over their laptops. A few were quietly taking phone calls. Curiously, no one was talking, no one was eating, and no one was there for lunch.

Crave has gotten into the coworking business. In April, the restaurant partnered with a startup called Spacious to transform its dining room into a weekday workspace. After all, in an age where everyone seems to have a side hustle, why shouldn’t a restaurant? Founded in 2016, Spacious bills itself as a cheaper, more flexible alternative to traditional coworking spaces like WeWork.”

“Brian Owens, the restaurant’s owner, said the Spacious partnership has been a welcome source of revenue in an industry where profit margins are tight. Crave has another location, in Midtown East, which is open for lunch because it’s near offices and other businesses. But the Upper West Side, Owens said, is a dead zone on weekday afternoons.”

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Great News for Restaurants as IRS Reaffirms Deductions for Entertaining

“The Internal Revenue Service is giving businesses a tax break they thought they had lost in the tax overhaul last year — write-offs for wining and dining clients.

The agency said Wednesday companies can still deduct 50 percent of meals while entertaining clients and customers, clearing up confusion about whether tax law changes last year had completely eliminated that benefit.”

“Kathy Petronchak, the director of IRS practice and procedure at Alliant Group and the chair of the meals and entertainment task force at the CPA group, said that the guidance and examples “align with what we had hoped to see with the clear distinction between entertainment and allowable business expenses for meals.”

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Dunkin’s Espresso Flavors Craft Beer For Fall

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The two iconic beverage brands have come together for the first time to launch a balanced, malty tasting, smooth brew starting October 1. The 12 ounce bottles and drafts will be available throughout the fall season, at select retail locations across the Eastern U.S.

Harpoon Dunkin’ Coffee Porter first premiered September 27 at Dunk-toberfest, the aptly named introduction to Harpoon’s annual Octoberfest event.The new, 6% ABV Dunkin’ Porter has a smooth mouthfeel with aromas of espresso and dark chocolate. The brew pairs perfectly with fall favorites like hearty stews, seasonal desserts, tailgating and, Dunkin’s signature donuts.

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How Eateries Can Implement a More Sustainable Packaging Strategy

“The abundance of recent announcements by cities and foodservice companies enacting bans on plastic drinking straws can make it seem like straws are the chief culprit when it comes to plastic waste. However, straws make up a small portion of plastic waste, and over-emphasizing efforts to get rid of straws could distract from a more comprehensive approach to foodservice sustainability that would have a much greater impact than focusing on straws alone. As off-premise sales continue to grow for restaurants, foodservice packaging will only proliferate, so it’s important that restaurants invest in packaging that’s more sustainable from the start and help consumers dispose of it responsibly.

To further cut down on the amount of foodservice packaging that ends up as waste, restaurants should make sure they’re purchasing recyclable materials and disposing of them properly. A high percentage of restaurant operators report that they recycle, according to the National Restaurant Association’s 2017 Restaurant Sustainability Survey, which found that 29% of restaurants recycle rigid plastics such as cups, some 22% recycle cling wrap and other flexible plastics, and 65% recycle paper and cardboard.”

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The Red Cat, a Pioneering Chelsea Restaurant, Will Close

“The Red Cat, an unpretentious neighborhood restaurant in Chelsea that became a destination, will close at the end of December after nearly 20 years in business. The reason is none of the usual suspects: a big rent hike, slumping traffic or the need for a costly renovation, said the chef, Jimmy Bradley. He has simply decided to quit.”

“(…) “My goal was to have my own business by the time I was 30,” Mr. Bradley said. He was 31 when he became the chef and an owner of the Red Cat, on 10th Avenue.
Chelsea was a much different place back then, with no High Line, art-gallery scene or sleek high-rise condominiums. London Terrace had elegant apartments; nearby there were, and still are, public housing projects. Gentrification has not had a huge impact on the Red Cat’s business Mr. Bradley said. The condos often have absentee owners who don’t come in for a bowl of lentil soup or a plate of local skate, and tourists plying the High Line are not particularly tuned in to the restaurant’s presence.

“It’s difficult for small businesses in New York now,” Mr. Bradley said. “My staff can’t afford to live nearby like me. They get home at 2 a.m. and have to be back at work at 9.”

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102-year-old Orwasher’s Bakery is preserving NYC nostalgia while adapting to the times

“The original Upper East Side location of Orwasher’s opened in 1916 on East 78th Street between 1st and 2nd Avenues by a Hungarian immigrant named Abraham Orwasher when a swatch of Yorkville was known as “Little Hungary.” The Orwashers used family recipes for the high-quality rye, black, and grain breads of their homeland, baking them all in a basement brick oven and delivering the loaves by horse and carriage. Thought the Upper East Side location looks small from the outside, there were, literally, millions of pounds of dough being mixed there. Doing a quick calculation, Keith estimates that this amounted to more than 10 million loaves of bread over its 103-year history. Today, Orwasher’s churns out between 9,000 and 10,000 loaves a day!”

“He describes the vintage East Side store as “an oasis.” When you walk in, “it seems like you’re going to a country store in Vermont.” But even though the 1,200-square-foot West Side location on the corner of 81st and Amsterdam is a bit more modern, the customer base is quite similar. A lot of people used to travel across town and now have a store closer.”

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