Low price growth signals tight financial times for grocery

“As prices fall or stay the same for many grocery items, consumers will rejoice — or they may not notice. But grocers notice in a big way. Already low margins have shrunk even further, and there is less room to cut costs in order to stay competitive. Last month’s prices only increased in one sector. They decreased 1.3% for nonalcoholic beverages, 0.6% for dairy, 0.4% for produce, and 0.2% for bakery products, according to BLS statistics. The increase in meat, poultry, fish and egg prices just barely pulls grocery stores into having net higher prices.”

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Employee touching hair then preparing food leads to failed inspection.

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“SAN ANTONIO – A sushi restaurant in the Blue Star complex failed a city health inspection last month after an employee was seen touching their hair then continuing food preparation work. The inspector also noted that the restaurant needed, “an overall cleaning and organizing of personal and establishment food and dish wares.”

“Metropolitan Health Department records confirm that Sukeban had corrected all of its violations.”

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How Restaurants Are Winning Over The Youngest Diners

“Kids menus—particularly at chain restaurants—have taken a beating for being unhealthy, uninteresting and unevolved. But while parents have pushed for the elimination of sugary soft drinks and the addition of fruit and veggies, it’s not just healthier menu choices that make a restaurant kid-friendly. Service, ambiance and the dining experience as a whole matter to parents and their children—especially the largest group of parents: millennials.”

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NYC Has a Ban on Black Foods with Activated Charcoal

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“The DOH has forced at least Morgenstern’s and Round K to stop selling their popular black-colored edibles.”

“Scientists are generally skeptical of the purported health benefits of activated charcoal, like getting rid of bad chemicals in the body, but in small quantities, activated charcoal is not going to hurt you, either. It’s become super trendy for cafes and restaurants with a healthy bent across the country to serve, both in beverages and in foods. Cocktails, burger buns, bagels, and juices have all been sold with the stuff lately.”

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Starbucks Raises Its Coffee Prices

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“Evaluating prices periodically allows us to balance the need to run our business profitably while continuing to provide value to our loyal customers and attract new customers – the spokesperson said.”

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The Restaurant Inspector: Rising Grades, Fainting Owners

“New York’s inspectors have long been capable of showing up unannounced, recording violations and, if necessary, shutting down a kitchen. But in 2010, they acquired a new dimension of power: the ability to assign letter grades (printed on placards that must be visible from the street) and to post their findings in an online database where anyone can scrutinize a restaurant’s inspection history. Restaurateurs complained bitterly about the “scarlet letters,” and what they saw as punitive enforcement aimed at raising money for the city.

 

Eight years on, that furor has cooled. The number of restaurants with an A grade rose to 93 percent in April, from 81 percent in that first year. Yet many restaurateurs still feel aggrieved about the rating system; they talk of the health inspectors as arbitrary, unjust — and frightening enough to send an owner to the hospital with a panic attack.

As it turns out, the man in beige who precipitated that crisis is a pleasant, even-keeled individual named Fayick Suleman, who lives in the Bronx with his wife and two children, and — like the letter-grading system — is celebrating his eighth anniversary at the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.”

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Women leave the best tips – even when service suffers

“Women gave a 9 percent gratuity, while men averaged 7 percent, when there was hair in a diner’s food and the server failed to replace the meal. A rude server got a 7 percent tip from women and a 5 percent tip from men.

Gen Xers, born between 1965 and 1980, were the biggest tippers in several scenarios. Servers who went the extra mile by offering a free drink or food item were rewarded by GenXers. The group also was more generous with kitchen mistakes such as finding hair in their food as long as the meal was replaced, per Discover.

Millennials, born 1981 to 1998, didn’t really appreciate an extra attentive server and were the least forgiving with their tips when it came to mistakes in the kitchen. Baby Boomers, born 1946 to 1964, reduced tips when servers were rude or flirty and when they couldn’t get their desired table.”

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