No Kid Hungry Kickoff Party @ Ward III

See below flier for details on the No Kid Hungry kickoff party hosted at Ward III on Monday, March 19th!

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Retail Spotlight: ATLA

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When one of the best chefs in the world—the only chef with two restaurants on the Fifty Best list, in fact—opens a casual, all-day affair in Manhattan’s trendiest neighborhood, you get ATLA. Enrique Olvera’s stripped-down sibling establishment to the dressed-up Cosme is no slouch. Chef Olvera and his Chef de Cuisine, Daniela Soto-Innes, have created another hit: one that dabbles in all day-parts and succeeds from 8AM to 2AM.

 

The first thing you notice about ATLA, after the well-earned press and praise, is the space. It’s stylish, sleek, and minimalist. The focus here is food, beverage, and people—those inside and those walking past the giant, aquarium windows through NoHo.   Second: the cheery, attentive service team at the ready to settle you in for the fun—be it fresh juice, guacamole toast, single-farm mezcal, or the newly-launched tacos. Finally, that food, which is light, bright, and packing punches you don’t anticipate but welcome warmly. The chicken enchiladas, for example, bathed in either verde or rojo salsa, is excellent in its simplicity, but unlike any enchilada you’ve had before. Sweet blueberries come nested on top of coconut yogurt and drizzled in olive oil. And that’s just breakfast! Stay all day to catch the dinner menu, which abounds with more hits, like the ayocote hummus, fish Milanese, and ceviche verde.

 

The Takeaway: All-day dining is on the rise in NYC, as restaurateurs look to maximize revenue from rent-straddled locations. Few are doing it better than ATLA, which occupies a space that encourages sitting, watching, and indulging. The menu excels in the morning as well as at night—which is its key to approachability. Not designed to be Cosme-light, but rather of its own identity, ATLA succeeds by providing compelling reasons to visit: superb food, beverages, and service that cater to diners throughout the day.

DUMBO Pearl Plaza Subconcession Notice of Solicitation

The DUMBO BID, a not-for-profit corporation organized under the laws of the State of New York, is seeking proposals (“Proposals”) from qualified firms (“Proposers”) by this request (“RFP”) to manage and operate a FOOD AND BEVERAGE subconcession (“Subconcession”) at the Pearl Plaza located on Water Street between Adams Street and Anchorage Place in DUMBO, Brooklyn, NY, as more particularly hereinafter described (referred to as the “Plaza”). The Plaza is furnished with tables, chairs, and planters, and is open year-round (weather dependent).

It is the goal of the DUMBO BID to work closely with the chosen Proposer to create a Subconcession that is successful and enhances the atmosphere of the Plaza and this vibrant neighborhood. The Subconcession should provide an amenity for those who work and live in the area as well as those who visit the Plaza.

The DUMBO BID was created in 2006 and provides a number of programs and services in the area, including supplemental sanitation services, marketing, promotions, events small business support and capital improvements for the neighborhood of DUMBO, Brooklyn.

The Plaza was constructed/installed by the New York City Department of Transportation (“DOT”) in 2008. The DUMBO BID has a concession license agreement (“License Agreement”) with DOT for the operation, management and maintenance of the Plaza allowing for the operation and management of subconcession(s), where no leasehold or other proprietary rights are offered. The DUMBO BID will make copies of the License Agreement available to any Proposer who wishes to review it in its entirety. The DUMBO BID is responsible for the ongoing maintenance of the Plaza. Such maintenance services will include but not be limited to cleaning and trash removal, snow removal (walkways), landscape maintenance, and repairs.

See the opportunity here

7 Ways NYC Chefs and Restaurants Are Responding to Immigration Crackdowns

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In the wake of increased nationwide crackdowns on immigrant workers at restaurants, restaurants and chefs across New York are finding ways to both celebrate the varied foods that immigrants bring, as well as plant themselves as pro-immigrant businesses.

Most recently, Broadway actor Adam Kantor and Dinner Lab founder Brian Bordainick teamed up for Story Course, an event series that combines food and theater to spotlight immigrant chefs. It’s dinner with an interactive show, and each one is tailored specifically to the chef’s immigration story.

“We are essentially consuming migration stories on a daily basis without necessarily knowing it. If you know the story behind the food you’re eating, does it taste different? Can you be emotionally moved by a dish if you understand it in a narrative way?” Kantor says. “We wanted to explore these ideas of what it means to be an immigrant and an American and especially living in NYC, which is a city full of immigrant chefs.”

First up is Jae Jung, who until recently was a cook at Le Bernardin and will soon work the line at The NoMad. Jung emigrated from Korea in 2009 to enroll at the Culinary Institute of America before spending years cooking in Nashville and eventually returning to New York City. Her menu is an exploration of that journey, starting with a strictly Korean course and incorporating Southern and French elements as the courses — and her story — progress.

Read the full article here

The Case Against Tipping in America

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When a night at a restaurant or bar finally comes to a close, most Americans engage in an instinctive ritual. They dig into their wallets, fiddle with their smartphone calculators, and then decide how much money to give their server or bartender for a job well done.

Tipping, while practiced around the world, assumes a unique role in America, one to which most diners are obliged, because the United States is one of the only countries that allows businesses to offload the burden of paying workers a fair wage to their customers. And though construed as a fair way to encourage hospitality and reward good service, tipping’s roots are in racialized exploitation, while recent data shows that it continues to be, at its core, racist, sexist, and degrading.

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Request for Bids (RFB) for the Operation of Six (6) Mobile Food Concessions at the Battery, Manhattan

In accordance with Section 1-12 of the Concession Rules of the City of New York, the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation (“NYCDPR”) is issuing, as of the date of this notice, a Request for Bids (RFB) for the operation of six (6) mobile food concessions at the Battery, Manhattan.

Hard copies of the RFB can be obtained, at no cost, commencing February 23, 2018 through March 23, 2018 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., excluding weekends and Holidays, at the Revenue Division of NYCDPR, which is located at 830 Fifth Avenue, Room 407, New York, NY 10065. All bids submitted in response to this RFB must be submitted by no later than Friday, March 23, 2018 at 11:00 a.m.

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Coffee Beans Are Good for Birds, Fancy Brew or Not

 

17TB-COFFEE6-superJumbo.jpgBirds are not as picky about their coffee as people are.

Although coffee snobs prefer arabica beans to robusta, a new study in India found that growing coffee does not interfere with biodiversity — no matter which bean the farmer chooses.

In the Western Ghats region of India, a mountainous area parallel to the subcontinent’s western coast, both arabica and robusta beans are grown as bushes under larger trees — unlike in South America, where the coffee plants themselves grow as large as trees, said Krithi Karanth, who helped lead the study, published Friday in the journal Scientific Reports.

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