Influential Thai Restaurant Pok Pok Brooklyn Is Closing

“Pok Pok opened in 2012 to much acclaim, scoring two stars from Eater’s Ryan Sutton and another two in the Times for its unabashedly spicy and funky Northern Thai flavors, especially in its popular fish sauce wings. It was instantly so busy that Ricker opened a bar nearby to handle the waiting crowds. He also moved his smaller noodle and wing shop to the street. But like Ricker said, the Columbia Street Waterfront has indeed failed to catch on, and he eventually closed the smaller shop and gave the bar space to celebrity chef Carla Hall — who also eventually closed there”.

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A Goodbye to Great Jones Cafe, a Vestige of Downtown NYC’s Old Magic

“The Jones it was reliable, it was cheap-ish, it was good (with flashes of comfort food greatness), and there were always seats or would be seats soon, whenever you went. It was the sort of spot where you were more likely than not to be elbow-to-elbow with the sort of ambiguously and stratospherically cool people who made New York a place worth moving to. It was old downtown long after old downtown was gone, not that I was ever really here for it, having arrived to the city in 1998. It wasn’t a scene to make, but the scene was a pleasure to try to blend into.”

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Restaurants Near the Steam Pipe Explosion Are Losing Tens of Thousands of Dollars

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“Flatiron restaurants are losing tens of thousands of dollars in the days following the steam pipe explosion in the neighborhood — an incident last week that sprayed asbestos throughout the area and forced dozens of buildings to evacuate.

Taj II, a two-floor lounge and popular private events space on 21st Street, is in its fifth day of closure since the explosion on Thursday morning. Operations director Christopher Collins canceled several private events over the weekend, including a bar mitzvah, and two brunch services that would have had more than 400 people at each. He lost more than $100,000 in the process, he says.

Besides restaurants and other businesses, the steam pipe explosion impacted residents in the area, many of whom still couldn’t return home by Sunday night. Though only minor injuries were incurred with the incident, many people are fearful of the longer-term health impact. The city and ConEd, which operates the pipe, has yet to figure out what caused the explosion.”

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Union Square’s Iconic Diner Coffee Shop Will Close in October

“After 28 years of serving diner food to celebrities, tourists, and fashiony New Yorkers, Union Square’s iconic restaurant the Coffee Shop at 29 Union Square West will close.
The diner is one of the last remaining non-chain, sit-down restaurants left in Union Square, which has suffered a spate of high-profile closures like Union Square Cafe and Republic. Blue Water Grill remains open, but it’s fate is still uncertain.”

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NYC Has a Ban on Black Foods with Activated Charcoal

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“The DOH has forced at least Morgenstern’s and Round K to stop selling their popular black-colored edibles.”

“Scientists are generally skeptical of the purported health benefits of activated charcoal, like getting rid of bad chemicals in the body, but in small quantities, activated charcoal is not going to hurt you, either. It’s become super trendy for cafes and restaurants with a healthy bent across the country to serve, both in beverages and in foods. Cocktails, burger buns, bagels, and juices have all been sold with the stuff lately.”

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53-Yeard Old Le Perigord Shutters to Displace Union Labor

The costs involved with running a restaurant in New York City have never been more daunting.  Even for a stalwart of the fine-dining breed, labor costs can undue profitability.  And when a union is involved, the costs can become insurmountable.

Georges Briguer, who has owned the old-school French institution since 1966, has closed Le Perigord as he has not been able to reach terms with the restaurant union, Local 100.  The owner and the union had negotiated for four months to no avail.  Now, legally, closing and reopening as a new business is Mr. Briguer’s path forward.  According to the owner, “We would have to increase the price of the dinner too much…we have no choice,” in order to meet the new deal that would have required an additional $80 per day, per employee–about $12,000 per week–to cover the additional healthcare and pension requests.

In six months, the restaurant at 405 East 52nd will turn the lights back on under a new name: Restaurant 405.  Le Perigord, which once served neighborhood regulars and celebrities such as Truman Capote and Donald Trump alike, will be a memory.  The revised restaurant will have a new menu, but the owner hopes to rehire his staff, sans union.

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Colicchio & Sons to Close

19COLICCHIOS-WEB-master768.jpgColicchio & Sons, the eponymous Chelsea restaurant from Tom Colicchio, recently announced they would close their doors after a final dinner service on September 4th The restaurant has been open for 6 years, during which it earned 3 stars from the New York Times for it’s sophisticated techniques and devotion to craft.

Tom Colicchio announced the closing on August 18th, but did not give specific reasons. A likely possibility is that he is moving to focus on more casual concepts for financial reasons, as the market grows less friendly towards fine dining. Mr. Colicchio also plans to open a new concept, called Fowler & Wells, in the Beekman Thompson Hotel in the financial district.

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