Michelin Guide: New York City 2019 awards stars to 76 restaurants, up from 72

Screen Shot 2018-11-08 at 10.42.38 AM.png

“Michelin has handed out its coveted stars to 76 restaurants in New York City in its 2019 guide, four more than last year, boosting the Big Apple’s reputation as a global destination for its diverse and innovative culinary offerings.”

“Michelin will release the latest edition of its New York City eating guide tomorrow. Their grading system uses anonymous reviewers in 28 countries. Some argue it is rigid and overlooks some restaurants that critics and diners praise.

The restaurant rater awarded its highest ranking of three stars to the same five New York establishments as last year for their “exceptional cuisine, worth a special journey”: Chef’s Table at Brooklyn Fare, Eleven Madison Park, Le Bernardin, Masa and Per Se. But New York will still likely lag San Francisco in the number of three-star restaurants for a second year. San Francisco and the wine-producing regions of Napa and Sonoma had seven last year, the most of any US cities.”

Read more here.

World’s cheapest Michelin-starred restaurant opens second NYC location

“Tim Ho Wan has received a bunch of international hype throughout the years as it was dubbed the cheapest Michelin-starred restaurant in the world a year after it opened in 2009 and subsequently earned one star. The first NYC location launched in the East Village in 2016 to very long lines, serving its signature baked BBQ pork buns, steamed shrimp dumplings and pan-fried turnip cakes, all priced in the single digits.”

“The new location will serve these specials from head chef Yinghui Zhou, in a space inspired by 17th-century French salons, with Chinese accents like an embedded bamboo steamer and the Tim How Wan dragon logo.”

View more here.

Why Restaurants Struggle to Eliminate Tips

“It’s been three years since Danny Meyer became the unofficial leader of a movement to abolish tipping at restaurants, in an effort to level the playing field for front-of-house and back-of-house employees, among other things. In the process of converting his own restaurants to his so-called Hospitality Included model, he convinced a number of major restaurateurs to adopt similar pay structures. The upside, of course, is that these tip-free models theoretically decrease pay discrepancies between people who work in the dining room and the kitchen, and don’t rely on diners to essentially supplement workers’ incomes.

But after giving it the ol’ college try, two major restaurants have returned to the old way of doing things. The Wall Street Journal reports that Agern, the Nordic restaurant from Claus Meyer, and Michelin-starred Cafe China in midtown have both returned to the traditional tipping model and have seen great results.”

View more here.

New York restaurant La Sirena to close

New York restaurant La Sirena to close

“B&B Hospitality Group’s New York City restaurant La Sirena is scheduled to close after the end of the year, the company confirmed on Tuesday.

“We are very proud of our hard-working, dedicated professionals who deliver great dining experiences to our guests every day. Our guests know just how special La Sirena is, and we’re grateful for their patronage,” the statement said.

Batali, who co-founded the company with partners Joe and Lidia Bastianich, opened La Sirena in 2016. According to Eater, the restaurant began struggling even before Batali was accused of sexual misconduct. Batali is the subject of both civil and criminal investigations.

Read more here.