At Zauo, Diners Can Catch Their Own Dinners

“It’s catch-and-relish, not catch-and-release, at this new Japanese import. Customers can opt for baited hooks to snag rainbow trout, salmon trout, fluke, shrimp, flounder, farmed striped bass, rockfish, lobster or abalone swimming in the pools. Or a staff member can lend a hand. (Prices are $16 to $125 if they do the fishing, and $12 to $110 if you fish.) The chefs then prepare the seafood to order, salt-grilled, simmered in soy sauce, sashimi or tempura. Whimsically instructive menu cards provide guidance. The restaurant, which has 13 locations in Japan, was introduced there in 1993 by a company called Harbor House: The New York restaurant is its first branch outside that country. Takuya Takahashi, whose father was the founder, is president of the New York branch. A narrow but soaring space, the restaurant has a fish tank opposite the bar on the ground floor, and two more tanks on a loftlike second floor. The hull of an immense, hand-built polished wooden boat hangs from the ceiling. In addition to the freshly caught seafood, the menu offers a vast array of Japanese standbys, mostly seafood, including salads, sushi, hand rolls and rice and noodle dishes”.

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Seafood Chain Opening First NYC Restaurant in Kips Bay

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Food truck-turned-restaurant chain Cousins Maine Lobster is opening its first brick-and-mortar location in New York City after inking a lease at 77 Lexington Avenue in Kips Bay, Commercial Observer has learned.

The seafood franchise signed a 12-year deal for 2,700 square feet at the base of the four-story, mixed-use residential building at the southeast corner of East 26th Street, according to a release from Newmark Knight Frank, which represented Cousins Maine Lobster franchisee Yunus Shahul in the transaction.

The restaurant, slated to open before the end of this year, will occupy 1,500 square feet of ground-floor retail space and an additional 1,200 square feet of lower-level basement space, NKF said. The location was previously occupied by gluten-free Italian restaurant Tali.

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Shoppers Want Deals, Coupons for Groceries More Than Any Other Category

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“The 2018 Purse String Survey reveals that 93 percent of respondents show interest in coupons and deals. Some 82 percent typically use coupons for their routine, weekly grocery shopping trips, and nearly half (47 percent) do so for fill-in trips, as well.

But there’s also a major opportunity for online grocers, according to the research. Grocery ecommerce adoption is on the rise, with 13 percent of respondents saying they are buying more groceries online for delivery compared to last year, and 12 percent saying the same for click-and-collect. Delivery numbers rise even higher for dads and Hispanics, while click-and-collect numbers rise for Millennials and Millennial parents.”

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More New York City Restaurants Have ‘A’ Grades Than Ever Before

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“Eight years after former mayor Michael Bloomberg tasked the Department of Health with completely dismantling and rebuilding the city’s restaurant grading system, a record amount of restaurants have “A” grades, and that’s despite the fact that said grading system is as confusing and arbitrary as ever.”

“In this year’s Mayor Management Report, data shows that in fiscal year 2018, 93.7% of 24,000 restaurants received “A” grades compared to 93.3% of restaurants last year and 85.4% of restaurants in 2012. Meanwhile, the DOH continues to ding restaurants for violations that don’t relate to food safety, creating a system in which owners and chefs must pay fines and place “Grade Pending” signs in their windows while they contest their initial grade.”

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Where Can I Get the Freshest Coffee in the City?

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“It isn’t hard to find a good cup of coffee in New York City, but if you’re on the lookout for a cup of joe that tastes like the beans were picked yesterday and shipped to the coffee shop this morning, you’ll need to ask an expert. Erika Vonie, the first woman to win the New York Coffee Masters competition and the director of coffee at roast-to-order start-up Trade is here to help. (She’s also a certified Q grader, which is something like a coffee sommelier.”

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11 Recipes All Teens Need to Master Before Graduating High School

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1. Hard-Boiled Eggs

Learning to make both hard-boiled eggs and a basic omelet ensures you will always have a cheap, nutritious option for breakfast, lunch or dinner. To make hard-boiled eggs, place eggs in a pot and cover them with at least an inch of water. Bring the water to a boil and let it boil for one minute. Shut off the heat, cover the pot and let the eggs sit for 10 minutes. Remove the pot from the hot water after 10 minutes and let the eggs cool before trying to peel them.

2. An Omelet

Watch chef Jamie Oliver make the perfect omelet on YouTube; he demonstrates a completely unfussy, fool-proof technique for making a basic cheese omelet. As you master the basics, try tossing some chopped fresh spinach leaves into the center before folding for added nutrition.

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How the Union Square Partnership puts on the ‘best food event’ in New Yorks’

The 23rd annual Harvest in the Square will

As Harvest in the Square, a fundraising event put on by the Union Square Partnership and a favorite of foodies in the area, gears up for its 23rd edition later this month, patrons and sponsors alike reminisce on the good it has done for the neighborhood and look toward the park’s promising future still ahead.

These days, the partnership funds the park’s repairs, seasonal plantings, and seating area additions, but it also focuses on providing the neighborhood with a series of free programs year-round. From cooking demos with some of the city’s best chefs to outdoor concerts and film screenings, the organization offers events to maintain Union Square’s booming reputation, all free of cost.

This year’s Harvest in the Square will take place from 6 to 9 p.m. Sept. 20. Tickets start at $125, or $150 on the day, and can be purchased at www.harvestinthesquare.nyc

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