New Food Hall Planned for Chinatown

CSM_20WINDOW_20DISPLAY.0.jpgFood halls have been popping up everywhere lately, and – love them or hate them – the trend doesn’t seem to be slowing down. The latest addition is the planned Canal Street Market, set to open in November in 12,000 square feet of space on Canal between Broadway and Lafayette. There are 11 confirmed vendors, including bubble tea favorite Boba Guys, Davey’s Ice Cream, and a new concept Yori Nori from the team behind Chelsea Market’s ramen shop Mokbar. There will also be a retail portion to the market including home goods, ceramics and flowers.

Developer Phillip Chong describes the market as a way to appeal to the “gourmet-minded” and “young, energetic downtown creatives.” The space previously housed high-end clothing store Necessary Clothing, and a number of smaller shops before 2012.

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Good News for Soda Tax Advocates

pouring-sugar-out-of-soda-can.jpgA recent study on the soda tax in Berkeley, the first in the nation, brings good news for advocates of such taxes nationwide. Since January (when the tax went into effect), the city has apparently seen a one-fifth decline in sugary drink consumption.

The study, done by researchers at UC Berkeley, compared soda sales from April through July of 2014 with January through May of 2015 and found a 21% reduction in low-income neighborhoods. Since such neighborhoods are more likely to suffer from the health consequences of sweetened drinks, this is great news for tax advocates. The researchers do concede that there are flaws to such a study and it may be unwise to base too many policy decisions off their work. Soda consumption has already been on the decline, and the public battle between big soda and politicians may have had as much of an effect as the tax itself by raising awareness of soda’s health consequences.

To read more, click here.

Colicchio & Sons to Close

19COLICCHIOS-WEB-master768.jpgColicchio & Sons, the eponymous Chelsea restaurant from Tom Colicchio, recently announced they would close their doors after a final dinner service on September 4th The restaurant has been open for 6 years, during which it earned 3 stars from the New York Times for it’s sophisticated techniques and devotion to craft.

Tom Colicchio announced the closing on August 18th, but did not give specific reasons. A likely possibility is that he is moving to focus on more casual concepts for financial reasons, as the market grows less friendly towards fine dining. Mr. Colicchio also plans to open a new concept, called Fowler & Wells, in the Beekman Thompson Hotel in the financial district.

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New Food App Provides Restaurants Opportunity of Selling Unused Food

A new App launched in the UK called Too Good to Go gives restaurants a way to sell the unused food that would be otherwise trashed. Users order a head of time, then pick up their food during off-peak hours at a steep discount.

The app debuts in London this month and claims to have already signed up 95 restaurants, cafés, and bakeries so far.

According to co-founder Chris Wilson, restaurants not only eliminate some food-waste costs, they can also pocket some profit on the orders.

The App hope to be an innovative solution to 1.3 billion tons of food human’s waste per year!

Learn more here

Organic Food Joins the GMO Scuffle

Last week, we discussed the new law that Congress and President Obama passed that would require GMO labeling, and the industry pushback against the bill.  This week, the story continues with organic food producers who are roiled by non-organic but non-GMO packaging claims.

In the United States, “Organic” labeling laws are very strict and can require hefty investments in infrastructure and licensing.  However, “non-GMO” labels–not so much.  For organic food producers, this has become an unsettling situation, because annual sales of the Non-GMO Project-labeled food have skyrocketed from $7 billion two years ago to $16 billion today.  Meanwhile, the Non-GMO Project products tends to cost less than organic.

Thus, organic food companies are beginning to speak out with concerns, even though many of the first companies involved with the Non-GMO Project are in fact organic producers.  The Non-GMO Project started when organic producers wanted to test their foods for GMOs–a step not required by Organic labeling laws.

For the consumer, this creates a dissonance.  Most shoppers aren’t fully aware of the difference in expectations, or that the FDA has repeatedly stated that there is no health benefit to avoiding GMOs. “It’s a little frustrating, to be honest,” says Jesse LaFlamme, CEO and owner of Pete and Gerry’s Organic Eggs. “OK, it’s great that there’s a non-GMO symbol on there. But do you understand that that product might have been produced with pesticides, antibiotics, and with no regard for animal welfare?”

Laura Batcha, executive director of the Organic Trade Association, puts it this way: “Non-GMO is agriculture before GMOs were introduced, which is still chemical agriculture.”

To read more, click here.

FreshRealm Aims to Answer Meal-Kits’ Biggest Problem

right_open_stair_freshrealm-1-21-15-0048-1-1.jpgEven the strongest advocates of meal-kits (companies like Blue Apron and Hello Fresh which deliver recipes and ingredients to home cooks, specifically portioned for a single meal) have had to concede their biggest problem – the enormous waste of single-serve packaging. When each spice in a curry comes in an individual package (not to mention other glaring examples like single scallions or garlic cloves in their own plastic bags), cooks are bound to notice the packaging pile-up happening in their trash cans. Meal-Kit companies have begun trying to address this problem, making sure that packaging is recyclable and can even be returned to the company (Blue Apron in particular has taken this approach). But in the era of heightened food-safety awareness, there’s also only so much that can be done without putting contaminated ingredients in customers hands.

New Start-up FreshRealm aims to solve this problem with their “Vessel” – a reusable 17″ polyurethane cube in which they deliver all their ingredients. Drawers in the cube house not only individual ingredients, but metal plates that help control internal temperature, meaning FreshRealm does not require refrigerated trucks. All deliveries can be made by FedEx, who will then pick up the returned boxes the next day for sanitizing and reuse. So far the system has been so successful that FreshRealm is also selling it to competitors. Terra’s Kitchen, a Baltimore based delivery company, has already signed on.

To read more, click here.

Ikinari Steak Comes to New York from Japan, with Prime Rib and No Chairs

The popular Japanese steakhouse Ikinari steak, known for it’s unusual ordering style and standing-room-only dining room, will soon come to the East Village. Ikinari currently has more than 50 locations in Japan, and in areas with a large office population some Ikinari outposts feed as many as 500 office workers a day.

The fast-casual concept allows guests to order the exact number of grams of steak they’d like, which are then eaten at standing tables with a precisely calibrated height. Chef and Restaurateur Kunio Ichinose explains that such tables discourage diners from putting their forks and knives down between bites, allowing the restaurant to move guests through as quickly as possible. That throughput allows Ikinari to target workers with lower incomes than many steakhouses; a 7-ounce steak comes to about $16, a particularly good deal in Japan.

If such a fast paced setting doesn’t seem like your ideal way to eat steak, there may be some hope. Ikinari’s LES application for a liquor license indicates they may tweak the concept slightly for the New York market, encouraging guests to stay a moment longer and possibly even giving them a place to sit. After all, it’s hard to hold a fork, knife, and a beer through a full 7 ounces.

To read more, click here.

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