Where To Make Thanksgiving Dinner Reservations In New York City

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Preparing Thanksgiving dinner in a cramped New York City kitchen is the opposite of festive, and with so many excellent restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day, there’s no reason to clear out your oven-turned-sweater-storage to roast a turkey. Especially when you can outsource the cooking, and cleaning, to a renowned New York City restaurant.

Cote
Simon Kim’s Michelin-starred, hyper-trendy Korean steakhouse Cote will be serving a prix-fixe Thanksgiving feast. The menu includes four selected steak cuts from Cote’s dry-aging room, grilled tableside with classic Korean accompaniments. Chef David Shim will also be offering traditional sides like pomme aligot, roasted vegetables with maple syrup, butternut squash soup and cranberry and gravy sauces for the meat. A supplemental vension loin will be available a la carte. Festive sweets like pecan and pumpkin pie will end the meal. $72/person 

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World’s cheapest Michelin-starred restaurant opens second NYC location

“Tim Ho Wan has received a bunch of international hype throughout the years as it was dubbed the cheapest Michelin-starred restaurant in the world a year after it opened in 2009 and subsequently earned one star. The first NYC location launched in the East Village in 2016 to very long lines, serving its signature baked BBQ pork buns, steamed shrimp dumplings and pan-fried turnip cakes, all priced in the single digits.”

“The new location will serve these specials from head chef Yinghui Zhou, in a space inspired by 17th-century French salons, with Chinese accents like an embedded bamboo steamer and the Tim How Wan dragon logo.”

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7 New Restaurants at the Jersey Shore

A bone-in, rib-eye steak topped with seared scallops at Prime 13 Wood Fire Grill and Bar, which has locations in Point Pleasant Beach and Brielle.

Prime 13 Wood Fire Grill and Bar, Brielle 

“Earlier this month, two Jersey Shore restaurateurs came together to open the second location of Prime 13, a steakhouse in Point Pleasant known for its prime rib and 40-ounce rib-eye for two.

The restaurant opened in the space previously occupied by Brielle Ale House, owned by Chris, Frank and Matt Gullace. The brothers run the bar, and Gerard Tortora, owner of the Point Pleasant Beach restaurant, leads the kitchen. The menu is similar to Point Pleasant Beach: wood-fired filet mignon, dry-aged strip steak and rack of lamb with the option to add seared scallops, lobster tail and foie gras ($29.99 to $76); seafood dishes, and cocktails, plus 10 beers on tap, more than a dozen bottles, and nearly two dozen wines.”

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A Restaurant Brand Creator on How to Keep People Coming Back

“Sue Chan is the founder and chief executive officer of Care of Chan, a two-year-old brand management agency that has worked with a hit list of restaurants including Alta, Cosme, Una Pizza Napoletana, and Wildair to create that all-important but so-hard-to-capture great restaurant experience. Chan was previously the brand director at Momofuku for seven years.

At her own company, Chan focuses in on everything that makes a memorable restaurant experience the type of place that customers want to keep returning to again and again. While there’s no set formula for creating that unforgettable experience, once it’s in place it can drive sales and longterm customer loyalty like no quick-hitting press coverage can. “It doesn’t matter if you’re on Bon Appetit’s top ten, you could close in a year or two,” Chan explained. “That is a real thing that happens a lot. It’s more about just caring about the actual customers who come in every single day, and focusing on that community and building that community.”

See full interview here.

 

Winter Restaurant Promotions That Can Help Drive Business

Goulash, beef stew in cast iron pan, top view, close up

“With Christmas, Hanukkah, New Year’s Eve, and Valentine’s Day all taking place during the winter, restaurants have several holidays they can leverage to increase business. Valentine’s Day in particular, and the weekends surrounding it, are an especially popular time for couples to dine out. According to the National Restaurant Association, Feb. 14 is the second busiest day of the year for restaurants. To capitalize on the popularity, restaurants should accommodate diners by offering a special experience. Whether it’s by changing décor or providing a unique menu, going the extra mile will help your restaurant draw in more customers.”

“Cold weather results in reduced business since diners are more hesitant to leave the comfort of their homes. However, there are certain steps restaurants can take to limit the negative effects of winter.”

Read more here.

UNFI completes SUPERVALU acquisition

Image result for unfi“United Natural Foods Inc. closed its $2.9 billion purchase of Supervalu Inc. on Monday, with Supervalu shares disappearing from the New York Stock Exchange as the first sign of the completed takeover.

In coming months, United Natural aims to sell Supervalu’s grocery store chains, including Cub Foods, and narrow its business to wholesale distribution similar to its own.

United Natural Foods (UNFI), based in Providence, R.I., is the nation’s largest distributor of organic and natural foods. With Supervalu, the company will more than double its size and expand its reach into traditional foods and grocery stores.

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Chinese Noodles From a Chile-Haunted Region

“The rise of Sichuan food in New York has made the past decade or two a glorious era for prowlers of Chinese restaurants. Chongqing chicken and mung-bean jelly proliferated as skilled chefs flocked to the city. But while the miles of dan dan noodles and mountains of Sichuan peppercorns have been exhilarating, they have tended to overshadow the cuisine of another great chile-haunted region, Hunan.”

“When people in Hunan get hungry for a bowl of noodles, what they have in mind are mifen: long, white strands made from pounded rice, so smooth they may slither right out of the chopsticks of inexperienced slurpers. Chances for New Yorkers to practice their antiskid chopstick techniques have been limited, generally speaking, to the rice noodles of other parts of Asia. When you could find Hunanese noodles around town, they tended to be tucked away on larger menus with so many other Hunanese opportunities that they were rarely given a chance to slither.”

Read more here.