Truebird Swoops Into New York with Robotic Specialty Coffee Kiosks

Truebird coffee

“(…) Could the surly and spirited humans of old New York embrace a joe by droid? A new company called Truebird has fluttered in to find out.

Like its predecessors, Truebird pitches its system squarely at the specialty coffee crowd, claiming that its automated coffee kiosks offer drinks that are “consistently as good as those made by the best baristas using the finest ingredients and equipment.”

At a Truebird coffee station, customers are able to choose a fresh and locally roasted coffee from a touchscreen menu, then designate a type of milk and an espresso beverage style for the machine to execute.

The flat ceramic “standard” burrs of one of the machine’s two integrated grinders break the beans. An extraction occurs, and milk is stretched by unseen internals as the customer waits, while a trio of cute, black magnet-driven pucks charmingly coordinate to nudge cups around on the visible surface behind glass.

“We chose our magnetic transport solution versus other options, including an articulated robotic arm, for a variety of reasons, but chief among them was the surprisingly warm, approachable, and magical experience it creates,” Truebird CEO and Co-Founder Josh Feuerstein told Daily Coffee News. “We believe a coffee break is not just about the quality of the drink, but about the feel of the experience. We’ve tried to make every element of our product warm, approachable, and beautiful, from the design of the micro-cafe itself, to the mesmerizing experience of watching your cup glide from the espresso machine towards your hand. We keep that emotional component top-of-mind in our design process. It’s a fascinating challenge, especially for an automated product.”

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Fluffy Japanese Pancake in Chinatown

People are going wild for these Japanese souffle pancakes

“Chinatown Japanese dessert shop Taiyaki is drawing wildly long lines with a new menu item: fluffy souffle pancakes. People waited in a two-hour line to grab the pancakes last weekend, which come topped with sugar, butter, whipped cream, and syrup, or with matcha cream. The Chinatown restaurant at 119 Baxter St., between Canal and Hester Streets, is selling a stack for $7 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays.”

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Restaurant Menu Trends: What to Expect to See on More Menus in 2019

2019 restaurant menu trends

1. CBD (Cannabidiol) — up 99%!

It was only a matter of time before cannabidiol—or CBD—made its way into the restaurant industry. The non-psychoactive derivative from the cannabis plant has helped consumers looking for relief from inflammation, pain, anxiety, insomnia, seizures, spasms, and other conditions without the negative side effects of some pharmaceutical drugs.

According to the National Restaurant Association’s (NRA) What’s Hot Culinary Survey, a barometer of U.S. food and beverage trends, 650 professional chefs—all members of the American Culinary Federation—said infusing food and drink with cannabis and CBD could create unique cuisine opportunities and potential new markets for experiential dining occasions. Of the survey’s respondents, 77 percent identified cannabis/CBD-infused drinks as the number one trend in the restaurant industry right now, and 76 percent tapped cannabis/CBD-infused food as the second most popular trend.

Data from Upserve customers revealeda 99 percent increase in CBD menu items in 2018, setting up 2019 as the year of CBD. From baked goods to CBD-infused beverages, restaurants across the country are responding to a consumer demand to chill out.

“There has been growing popularity and support around CBD, and if it makes people happier and less stressed, then why not give the public what they want?” says Nick Duckworth, owner of cafe Banter NYC. They currently only sell Dirty Lemon CBD, a packaged, CBD-infused drink, but will be expanding their CBD offerings in 2019, allowing customers “to add CBD drops to most beverages.”

View all 2019 Menu trends here.

Why small wine lists may be ideal for restaurants

“Picture yourself in a fancy restaurant known for its wine list. The host hands you a heavy leather volume, or maybe an iPad, to peruse pages upon pages of bottle selections.

Maybe you’re in the mood for something specific, so you navigate to the category you want. From there, you focus on a country, a grape and finally, you make a selection from 10–12 bottles. But if you don’t have a predetermined wine in mind, you’re left guessing what your companions like and what will complement their meals. Sure, the floor sommelier can help, and it’s exciting to have s many options, but it can also add a layer of complication and intimidation.

Enter the small wine list. If a big tome conveys gravitas and leather-bound luxury, a small printed list speaks to elegance, simplicity and ease. Instead of flipping through numerous pages of bottles before you even look at the menu, you can order wine at a glance and focus on your date, friends or family.”

Read more here.

 

New NYC restaurants: Danish bakery Ole & Steen’s stateside debut, and more

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“Ole & Steen

“NYC’s Nordic offerings continue to grow beyond destinations such as the Great Northern Food Hall with the stateside debut of this 28-year-old Danish bakery. Find Danish rye breads, pastries and tarts, as well as sweet or savory porridges, open-faced sandwiches, salads and more on the all-day menu. Now open Mon.-Fri. from 6:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Sat.-Sun. from 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; 873 Broadway, 929-209-1020”

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Webster Hall Team Opens New Seneca Avenue Restaurant

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“The family behind New York’s Webster Hall has opened a new organic American eatery on Seneca Avenue. The Seneca combines a coffee shop, restaurant and bar inside the new digs that opened last summer at 582 Seneca Ave., owners said.

The eatery features a full coffee menu, kombucha on tap, a full menu of beers, natural wines and cocktails, and a short menu of elevated bar food. A breakfast sandwich comes with house-made sausage and hot sauce, the chicken club comes on pullman bread and the tacos come with either chorizo, avocado or mushrooms.

The Seneca is open from Monday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 2 a.m., the kitchen stays open until midnight and happy hour is from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. every day, according to the eatery’s website.”

See more here.

Different Types Of Restaurant Menus

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“Menu is essential for all restaurants and it plays an important role in promoting the business. A menu not only provides information about the food articles available at the restaurant along with prices, but also tempt the customer to order the food. Menu should be attractive and informative as in not long but it should be able to provide the necessary information.

Different restaurants have different approaches on serving the food and fixing prices for each item. Similarly different restaurants follow different menu styles. Here we are going to talk about the most commonly used five different types of restaurant menus.

Static Menu

This is the most common type of menu which has been accepted widely. Different food items will be categorized into different groups and subgroups such as appetizers, entrees, salads, soups, desserts etc. This type of menu will be kept laminated for easy cleaning and will contain several pages. Most of the fast food restaurants use this type of menu.

A’la Carte Menu

When different food items are sold individually, this type of menu will be the best. For example, when you order a steak, it will not accompany salads and potatoes. You will have to order them separately. In such restaurants, the prices of each item should be shown individually.

Table d’hote Menu

In some restaurants where food items are sold as multi course meals. Here the choices will be less and the charges will be for the meal not for individual items. Customer will not have a choice to order individual items. In such restaurants “Table d’hote” type of menu will be the best choice. This is also known as “Prix Fixe Menu”.

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Coca-Cola Backs Restaurant Tech Company

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“Coca-Cola’s 2018 investment binge continues with a contribution to Hayward, Cali.-based restaurant tech company Omnivore.

The Coca-Cola Co. (NYSE: KO) was a lead investor in a $10 million Series A for Omnivore, a universal point-of-sale connectivity platform, alongside Performance Food Group and additional funds from Tampa Bay Lightning owner, Jeff Vinik.

Omnivore promotes an “end-to-end suite of solutions” to help optimize the digital restaurant experience, such as online ordering, paying at the table, third-party delivery, kiosk/digital menus and analytics. The financing will be used to accelerate current development and growth of proprietary Omnivore products that minimize friction for restaurant brands, third-party technologies, and POS companies, according to a news release.”

View more here.

Where To Make Thanksgiving Dinner Reservations In New York City

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Preparing Thanksgiving dinner in a cramped New York City kitchen is the opposite of festive, and with so many excellent restaurants open on Thanksgiving Day, there’s no reason to clear out your oven-turned-sweater-storage to roast a turkey. Especially when you can outsource the cooking, and cleaning, to a renowned New York City restaurant.

Cote
Simon Kim’s Michelin-starred, hyper-trendy Korean steakhouse Cote will be serving a prix-fixe Thanksgiving feast. The menu includes four selected steak cuts from Cote’s dry-aging room, grilled tableside with classic Korean accompaniments. Chef David Shim will also be offering traditional sides like pomme aligot, roasted vegetables with maple syrup, butternut squash soup and cranberry and gravy sauces for the meat. A supplemental vension loin will be available a la carte. Festive sweets like pecan and pumpkin pie will end the meal. $72/person 

View more restaurants here.

 

Rice, bean bowls have become fan favorites

“Bowl builds are a powerhouse on menus today, fueled by a number of significant drivers. First, consumers love them so the demand is high. Thanks to a halo of wholesomeness, a promise of satiety and a bowlful of intriguing flavor combinations, that demand doesn’t look like it’s subsiding any time soon.

Second, bowls play well in a number of dayparts, from breakfast and lunch to that all-important snacking segment. “Bowls are easy to eat, they tend to look very pretty and for some reason, they open the door for people to be more adventurous with their menu choices,” says Jorge Cespedes, culinary creative director with Marlin Network, based in Springfield, Mo.”

“From an operator perspective, bowls have a place on every menu and in every daypart, playing into so many different trending flavor combinations.” They also are an ideal delivery system for the plant-forward trend, offering a perfect format for greens, grains, beans and legumes.”

Read more here.