New Jewish-style deli coming to Lexington from Versailles restaurant owners

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“Another well-known Versailles restaurant is opening a Lexington outpost: Addie’s at the Woodford Inn is opening Stein’s by Addie’s in early December. Addie’s is a bed and breakfast and restaurant, with a live music venue. Addie’s also has food truck.

Stein’s will be a New York-style deli, according to owner Linda Parker. The name is a shortened version of her maiden name, Edelstein. Her father was Jewish, she said, but she isn’t.

However, she wanted to open a Jewish-style deli that will serve corned beef, salami and Reuben sandwiches, chicken salad, soups and other items.”

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Iconic Carnegie Deli Returns for One-Week Marketing Stunt

“Iconic Jewish delicatessen Carnegie Deli will return for a one-week-long pop-up. From December 1 through 8 — just in time for Hanukkah — 201 Lafayette St. in Nolita will be open from 11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m., with everything on the menu under $1. Carnegie Deli closed to much agita in 2016 after 79 years in Midtown, and the restaurant’s famed overstuffed pastrami and corned beef sandwiches are now being used to promote season two of Amazon show Marvelous Mrs. Maisel, a period piece about a Jewish female comedian in 1950s New York City.”

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7 New Restaurants at the Jersey Shore

A bone-in, rib-eye steak topped with seared scallops at Prime 13 Wood Fire Grill and Bar, which has locations in Point Pleasant Beach and Brielle.

Prime 13 Wood Fire Grill and Bar, Brielle 

“Earlier this month, two Jersey Shore restaurateurs came together to open the second location of Prime 13, a steakhouse in Point Pleasant known for its prime rib and 40-ounce rib-eye for two.

The restaurant opened in the space previously occupied by Brielle Ale House, owned by Chris, Frank and Matt Gullace. The brothers run the bar, and Gerard Tortora, owner of the Point Pleasant Beach restaurant, leads the kitchen. The menu is similar to Point Pleasant Beach: wood-fired filet mignon, dry-aged strip steak and rack of lamb with the option to add seared scallops, lobster tail and foie gras ($29.99 to $76); seafood dishes, and cocktails, plus 10 beers on tap, more than a dozen bottles, and nearly two dozen wines.”

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Pastrami Is the Priority at These Old-School New Jersey Delis

For all the talk of authentic Jewish delis going extinct, a few still take great pride in their pastrami.  A pastrami sandwich at Harold’s New York Deli Restaurant in Edison, New Jersey weighs 20 ounces.  The triple-decker at Harold’s weighs in at 3.5 pounds!  Sharing is thankfully encouraged with no fee.

The owner Harold Jaffe says that the deli sells 8,000 pounds of pastrami a week (all of which is made at the restaurant).  Mr. Jaffe learned the business by working at the Carnegie Deli in Manhattan for ten years.

Customers enjoy bar that offers slices of rye bread, half-sours, spicy pickle chips and health salad (cabbage mixed with oil and vinegar).

The Kosher Nosh is another deli located in Glen Rock, New Jersey, and has been in business for 40 years.  The store is run by Avi Friede and Haim Peer, both originally from Israel.  Mr, Friede says that by selling pastrami, lox, corned beef and other traditional deli foods, he is getting back to his Eastern European food roots.

Hobby’s Delicatessen and Restaurant in Newark, New Jersey was purchased by Sam Brummer in 1962 and passed on to his sons Marc and Michael.  The sons were taught to buy quality goods, prepare the goods well, provide excellent service and be a mensch (a person of integrity and honor).  The pastrami sandwich is the restaurant’s best seller, even with a 12-page menu.  According to Michael Brummer, there is one thing as important as properly steaming and slicing meat: schmoozing.

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