This Is the Number 1 Sign of High Intelligence, According to Jeff Bezos

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Amazon founder Jeff Bezos sits atop one of the most successful companies of our time, not to mention a personal fortune of some $150 billion. I think we can all agree that by any meaningful definition the guy is pretty smart. It’s also obvious he has a talent for surrounding himself with other smart people who can help make his vision reality.

How does he find them? It’s a question he addressed when he stopped by the Basecamp offices a few years ago, the company’s founder, Jason Fried, reports on the Basecamp blog. And the answer Bezos gave was the exact opposite of what most folks would expect.

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How To Address Lack Of Employee Engagement

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“Your culture can propel your profits, sales, employee retention over the goal post or have it fall short. The cost of not making it over the goal line is something any small to mid-size business cannot afford.”

“In the U.S., according to the US Census Bureau, 97.7 percent of all U.S. businesses have fewer than 20 employees. Many of these employees wear multiple hats to keep costs down and profits up.”

“The most recent survey suggested approximately a third of employees are actively engaged leaving two thirds not engaged or actively disengaged. The cost of disengaged employees is estimated to be 34 percent of their salary due to lost productivity, missed shifts, disruption to others, tardiness, etc., Gallup found. Recently I attended a meeting where the CEO asked for some input from his advisers regarding what to do with negative, complaining people. He made the remark several times this was a small thing, but the behaviors of the negative people were hurting his efforts to more the organization forward. He had inherited longtime tenured employees where their beliefs were “We will be here after you leave.”

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The Smart Espresso Profiler (SEP) Adds Flow and Pressure Profiling to Virtually Any Machine

Smart Espresso Profiler (SEP)

“Until recently, it has required thousands, if not tens of thousands of dollars’ worth of specialized equipment to accurately measure and act upon several of the more important factors in espresso brewing — factors such as the duration and force of pre-infusion, the pressure profile for the rest of the shot, and the cutting-edge tweak du jour: the flow rate.

These barriers to entry might be disintegrating, however, now that espresso accessory-maker Naked Portafilter has developed and launched a new tool for home and professional baristas that appears to be breaking the field wide open.

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20 Excellent Asian Desserts to Try in NYC

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In most East Asian and Southeast Asian countries, traditional dessert is not the decadent, butter-and-cream affair that it is in Western cuisine. Often times, the last course of the meal is refreshing and cooling, employing flavors like green tea, taro root, and tropical fruit to help cleanse the palate.

But with so many shades of Asian restaurants popping up across town in the last decade — from hyper-traditional to distinctly Asian-American — New York’s best Asian desserts have come to comprise new trends from the Asian continent as well as genre-defying creations that marry classic flavors with pastry technique. From the staples of Chinatown and Flushing to the new-school cakes and cones that have taken over Instagram, these are the Asian desserts to track down in NYC.

 

1. Kulu Desserts

Sago, or tapioca pudding, is a popular dessert in the Philippines and other parts of Southeast Asia. At Kulu Desserts, which has locations in Brooklyn, Elmhurst, and Flushing, these tiny tapioca balls appear in various puddings and cold desserts with fresh fruit, but it’s the warmed taro sago — thickened with sweet coconut milk — that rises above. Served in a bowl like a hot soup, it’s a soul-warming sweet treat ideal for a chilly day.

 

2. Soy Bean Chan Flower & Gift Shop

In Asia, bean curd is a versatile ingredient to be used in dishes both savory and sweet, and indeed that’s how it’s served as this flower shop-meets-tofu joint in Flushing. While the salty version of the dish, called dou fu hua, comes with dried shrimp and pickled mustard greens, its sweet counterpart soaks the silky curd with the traditional sweet ginger syrup. It’s a crazy affordable option — each cup costs just $1.75.

 

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Shoppers Want Deals, Coupons for Groceries More Than Any Other Category

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“The 2018 Purse String Survey reveals that 93 percent of respondents show interest in coupons and deals. Some 82 percent typically use coupons for their routine, weekly grocery shopping trips, and nearly half (47 percent) do so for fill-in trips, as well.

But there’s also a major opportunity for online grocers, according to the research. Grocery ecommerce adoption is on the rise, with 13 percent of respondents saying they are buying more groceries online for delivery compared to last year, and 12 percent saying the same for click-and-collect. Delivery numbers rise even higher for dads and Hispanics, while click-and-collect numbers rise for Millennials and Millennial parents.”

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13 Exemplary Chinese Soup Dumplings in NYC

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“Soup dumplings, also known by their Chinese name of xiao long bao (or XLB for short), were first popularized in New York City over 20 years ago by Joe’s Shanghai. But these soup-filled purses with a tiny pork meatball inside, and sometimes a wad of crabmeat on top, have a far longer history. They originated in the Shanghai suburb of Nanxiang around 1875, and quickly took their place among Shanghai’s other dumpling styles. The secret: a gelatin-laced filling that turns liquid during steaming.

In fact, the best ones usually arrive in a bamboo steamer, and eating them requires some skill: Gingerly lift the dumpling onto your spoon by its topknot with the tongs provided or with chopsticks, nip off the knot with your teeth, suck out the gravy, pour in the black vinegar-and-ginger sauce if you like, then eat the remainder. Just let them cool first — trust me.”

  1.  Nan Xiang Xiao Long Bao

    For a decade, the lines have stretched out the door at this modest Flushing dumpling house, which was once said to have the best XLB in town. They’re offered in the usual two varieties alongside rice cakes, noodles, and breakfast specialties. The juicy buns are indeed thin-skinned and wonderfully wobbly, with the crab variation featuring a good quantity of crustacean inside the filling and on top — though the palm has passed to other providers as far as first-place soup dumplings goes.

     

  2. Kung Fu Xiao Long Bao

    This delightful spot with plenty of blonde wood chairs is one of a small collection of Taiwanese restaurants just north of the Long Island Expressway. The XLB here are carefully made with a particularly rich gravy, and don’t be deterred that only one of the crab versions of the dumplings has a wad on top: The rest have a generous quantity mixed inside with the pork.

     

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How Hudson Yards Chose Its 25 Restaurants

“On March 14, 2019, Hudson Yards will fully open its eastern portion. Twenty-five restaurants will fire up the stoves. More than 100 stores will fling open their doors. Marquee companies like BlackRock, Wells Fargo, and HBO will occupy office space. An entirely new neighborhood will spring into existence in what seems like an instant.

In reality, though, it’s taken mega-developer Related Companies over a decade to get to this moment. In that time, Hudson Yards — the stagnant rail yard area between 30th and 34th streets and 10th and 12th avenues — has turned into a modern adult playground of luxury retailers and restaurants, park space, and public events that have come to fruition through the vision of Related Urban CEO Kenneth Himmel.”

“Everything is designed to pull people in and up: the escalators, the open floor plan, Neiman Marcus starting on level five, the Keller and Estiatorio Milos flagships on five and six. Restaurants on higher floors are common in other countries, especially in Asia, but the format has not quite caught on in the United States — yet, if Himmel has his way.”

Read more here.