DUMBO Pearl Plaza Subconcession Notice of Solicitation

The DUMBO BID, a not-for-profit corporation organized under the laws of the State of New York, is seeking proposals (“Proposals”) from qualified firms (“Proposers”) by this request (“RFP”) to manage and operate a FOOD AND BEVERAGE subconcession (“Subconcession”) at the Pearl Plaza located on Water Street between Adams Street and Anchorage Place in DUMBO, Brooklyn, NY, as more particularly hereinafter described (referred to as the “Plaza”). The Plaza is furnished with tables, chairs, and planters, and is open year-round (weather dependent).

It is the goal of the DUMBO BID to work closely with the chosen Proposer to create a Subconcession that is successful and enhances the atmosphere of the Plaza and this vibrant neighborhood. The Subconcession should provide an amenity for those who work and live in the area as well as those who visit the Plaza.

The DUMBO BID was created in 2006 and provides a number of programs and services in the area, including supplemental sanitation services, marketing, promotions, events small business support and capital improvements for the neighborhood of DUMBO, Brooklyn.

The Plaza was constructed/installed by the New York City Department of Transportation (“DOT”) in 2008. The DUMBO BID has a concession license agreement (“License Agreement”) with DOT for the operation, management and maintenance of the Plaza allowing for the operation and management of subconcession(s), where no leasehold or other proprietary rights are offered. The DUMBO BID will make copies of the License Agreement available to any Proposer who wishes to review it in its entirety. The DUMBO BID is responsible for the ongoing maintenance of the Plaza. Such maintenance services will include but not be limited to cleaning and trash removal, snow removal (walkways), landscape maintenance, and repairs.

See the opportunity here

7 Ways NYC Chefs and Restaurants Are Responding to Immigration Crackdowns


In the wake of increased nationwide crackdowns on immigrant workers at restaurants, restaurants and chefs across New York are finding ways to both celebrate the varied foods that immigrants bring, as well as plant themselves as pro-immigrant businesses.

Most recently, Broadway actor Adam Kantor and Dinner Lab founder Brian Bordainick teamed up for Story Course, an event series that combines food and theater to spotlight immigrant chefs. It’s dinner with an interactive show, and each one is tailored specifically to the chef’s immigration story.

“We are essentially consuming migration stories on a daily basis without necessarily knowing it. If you know the story behind the food you’re eating, does it taste different? Can you be emotionally moved by a dish if you understand it in a narrative way?” Kantor says. “We wanted to explore these ideas of what it means to be an immigrant and an American and especially living in NYC, which is a city full of immigrant chefs.”

First up is Jae Jung, who until recently was a cook at Le Bernardin and will soon work the line at The NoMad. Jung emigrated from Korea in 2009 to enroll at the Culinary Institute of America before spending years cooking in Nashville and eventually returning to New York City. Her menu is an exploration of that journey, starting with a strictly Korean course and incorporating Southern and French elements as the courses — and her story — progress.

Read the full article here

The Case Against Tipping in America


When a night at a restaurant or bar finally comes to a close, most Americans engage in an instinctive ritual. They dig into their wallets, fiddle with their smartphone calculators, and then decide how much money to give their server or bartender for a job well done.

Tipping, while practiced around the world, assumes a unique role in America, one to which most diners are obliged, because the United States is one of the only countries that allows businesses to offload the burden of paying workers a fair wage to their customers. And though construed as a fair way to encourage hospitality and reward good service, tipping’s roots are in racialized exploitation, while recent data shows that it continues to be, at its core, racist, sexist, and degrading.

Read the full article here

Request for Bids (RFB) for the Operation of Six (6) Mobile Food Concessions at the Battery, Manhattan

In accordance with Section 1-12 of the Concession Rules of the City of New York, the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation (“NYCDPR”) is issuing, as of the date of this notice, a Request for Bids (RFB) for the operation of six (6) mobile food concessions at the Battery, Manhattan.

Hard copies of the RFB can be obtained, at no cost, commencing February 23, 2018 through March 23, 2018 between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., excluding weekends and Holidays, at the Revenue Division of NYCDPR, which is located at 830 Fifth Avenue, Room 407, New York, NY 10065. All bids submitted in response to this RFB must be submitted by no later than Friday, March 23, 2018 at 11:00 a.m.

See the opportunity at here

Coffee Beans Are Good for Birds, Fancy Brew or Not


17TB-COFFEE6-superJumbo.jpgBirds are not as picky about their coffee as people are.

Although coffee snobs prefer arabica beans to robusta, a new study in India found that growing coffee does not interfere with biodiversity — no matter which bean the farmer chooses.

In the Western Ghats region of India, a mountainous area parallel to the subcontinent’s western coast, both arabica and robusta beans are grown as bushes under larger trees — unlike in South America, where the coffee plants themselves grow as large as trees, said Krithi Karanth, who helped lead the study, published Friday in the journal Scientific Reports.

Read the full article here

Food Brands Are Extremely Thirsty on Valentine’s Day


Happy Valentine’s Day. The #brands are thirsting for your love real hard, and they’re not afraid to show it. Food companies with millennial-focused marketing teams will take any opportunity to pull a stunt in hopes of going viral and drumming up some business. Here’s what’s going on in honor of this February 14.

Free wedding catering for lovebirds who get engaged at Panera Bread

The chain that is most famous for serving its soups, stews, and chowders inside hollowed-out loaves wants people to pop the question at one of its 2,000-plus locations. Those who do will be entered into a contest to have Panera cater their wedding for free. Bread bowls aren’t exactly typical wedding food, but for the five winners, cutting a major expense out of their big day would be a pretty good deal.

See more food brands here

Finding a Lost Strain of Rice, and Clues to Slave Cooking


CHARLESTON, S.C. — Among the biologists, geneticists and historians who use food as a lens to study the African diaspora, rice is a particularly deep rabbit hole. So much remains unknown about how millions of enslaved Africans used it in their kitchens and how it got to those kitchens to begin with.

That’s what made the hill rice in Trinidad such a find.

The fat, nutty grain, with its West African lineage and tender red hull, was a favored staple for Southern home cooks during much of the 19th century. Unlike Carolina Gold, the versatile rice that until the Civil War was America’s primary rice crop, the hill rice hadn’t made Lowcountry plantation owners rich off the backs of slaves.

Read the full article here